Presentation

Data Aware Large Scale Computing

DataMove is join research team in between INRIA and the LIG Lab

 

Keywords: Exascale; High Performance Computing; Parallel Algorithms; Scheduling; Multi-objective Optimization; Middleware; Batch Scheduler; High Performance Data Analytics;

Overview

Today’s largest supercomputers1 are composed of hundreds of thousands of cores, with performances reaching the PetaFlops. Moving data in such large supercomputers is becoming a major performance bottleneck, and the situation is expected to worsen even more at exascale and beyond. The data transfer capabilities are growing at a slower rate than processing power ones. The profusion of available flops will very likely be underused due to constrained communication capabilities. It is commonly admitted that data movements account for 50% to 70% of the global power consumption3. Thus, data movements are potentially one of the most important source of savings for enabling supercomputers to stay in the commonly adopted energy barrier of 20 MegaWatts. In the mid to long term, non volatile memory (NVRAM) is expected to deeply change the machine I/Os. Data distribution will shift from disk arrays with an access time often considered as uniform, towards permanent storage capabilities at each node of the machine, making data locality an even more prevalent paradigm.

The proposed DataMove team will work on optimizing data movements for large scale computing mainly at two related levels:

  • Resource allocation
  • Integration of numerical simulation and data analysis

The resource and job management system (also called batch scheduler or RJMS) is in charge of allocating resources upon user requests for executing their parallel applications. The grow- ing cost of data movements requires adapted scheduling policies able to take into account the influence of intra-application communications, I/Os as well as contention caused by data traffic generated by other concurrent applications. Modelling the application behavior to anticipate its actual resource usage on such architecture is known to be challenging, but it becomes critical for improving performances (execution time, energy, or any other relevant objective). The job management system also needs to handle new types of workloads: high performance platforms now need to execute more and more often data intensive processing tasks like data analysis in addition to traditional computation intensive numerical simulations. In particular, the ever growing amount of data generated by numerical simulation calls for a tighter integration between the simulation and the data analysis . The challenge here is to reduce data traffic and to speed-up result analysis by performing result processing (compression, indexation, analysis, visualization, etc.) as closely as possible to the locus and time of data generation. This emerging trend called in-situ analytics requires to revisit the traditional workflow (loop of batch processing followed by postmortem analysis). The application becomes a whole including the simulation, in-situ processing and I/Os. This motivates the development of new well-adapted resource sharing strategies, data structures and parallel analytics schemes to efficiently interleave the different components of the application and globally improve the performance.

To tackle these issues, we intertwine theoretical research and practical developments in an agile mode, to elaborate solutions generic and effective enough to be of practical interest. Algorithms with performance guarantees are designed and experimented on large scale platforms with realistic usage scenarios developed with partner scientists or based on logs of the biggest available computing platforms. Conversely, our strong experimental expertise enables to feed theoretical models with sound hypotheses, to twist proven algorithms with practical heuristics that could be further retro-feeded into adequate theoretical models.

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